Archive for January, 2019

On February 12, 2019 Teranet is hosting another insightful Market Insights Forum.

While in the past this has been an invite-only event, we have decided to open up the February 2019 Market Insights Forum to senior leadership within all major financial institutions, real estate companies, associations, and partner organizations (as capacity permits).

One of the keynote speakers is Stéfane Marion, Chief Economist and Strategist at the National Bank. He will provide a look back at what happened in 2018 and a discussion on how the changing economic and regulatory conditions could impact Canada’s housing market in 2019.

Joining Mr. Marion on the speakers’ list are Roger Vandomme and Mark Huttram.

Mr. Vandomme is the Chief Data Scientist at SMC and an instructor at the University of Toronto. He is speaking about artificial intelligence and what it has to do with human decision making. In his presentation, Mr. Vandomme will define big data, machine learning, and AI, and demystify buzz words often associated with those concepts. He will discuss algorithms associated with predictive modelling and machine learning, as well as how new technical frontiers such as image and language recognition can be applied to the real estate industry.

Mr. Huttram is the Director of Business Development and Marketing at Teranet. He is revealing exclusive market insights and update from Teranet.

For a full agenda and speaker bios, please click here: http://ci23.actonsoftware.com/acton/media/2216/teranets-market-insight-forum

The February 12, 2019 Teranet Market Insights Forum runs from 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at the MaRS Discover District, 101 College Street, Toronto, Ontario.

Don’t miss the opportunity to connect with peers and learn about what’s trending in our industry. Register for the February 12, 2019 Market Insights Forum here: http://ci23.actonsoftware.com/acton/media/2216/teranets-market-insight-forum

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmail
January 28, 2019

Last year in 2018 we saw many changes to the Canadian housing market. Now that 2019 is here, what will this year bring?

We’re breaking down real estate predictions for the year ahead. Here’s what’s on our radar:

1. Interest Rate Increases

In 2018, we saw Canadian interest rates rise from 1% to 1.75% and more hikes are on the horizon for 2019. Economists speculate we may see interest rates reach 2.25% by 2020.

This may seem small, but it could have a big impact on Canadian household debt. It may change what kinds of houses Canadians are able to afford and how well they can keep up with expenses, like utility payments.

2. Housing Prices

Overall, in 2018, house prices in Canada rose at a slow rate — the slowest since 2009 in some months. The Teranet-National Bank House Price Index has captured all of the data from the past year. Toronto and Vancouver have struggled, but other markets, like Montreal and Ottawa-Gatineau, have recorded larger increases over the past few months.

In 2019, we may see more stabilization, but it will likely take more time before we return to where we were.

3. Dwelling Shifts

With increased interest rates and mortgage stress tests, homebuyers are gravitating towards different dwelling types — in particular condos and multi-family units. Supply for single-family residential homes is tight in major cities.

This may mean that multi-family units continue to rise in popularity. It could also mean that more families seek out different areas to reside in — for example, opting for an affordable small town instead of a bigger urban centre.

4. More Affordable Housing

In 2018, the Ontario Real Estate Association (OREA) joined forces with other agencies to lobby the provincial government for more affordable housing options for millennials. Particularly in Toronto, OREA has said there is a housing crisis.

This conversation is taking place across the country about how to create more affordable housing, especially with home prices on the rise. We expect these talks will continue into 2019.

5. Insurance Premiums May Rise

As of January 1, 2019, new MICAT (mortgage insurer capital adequacy test) guidelines are in effect, which could see default insurance premiums rise.

6. Technology

Digital transformation has been a buzzword for a while, but in 2019 we are entering a new age of real estate technology. On the residential front, this will look like more smart devices in homes — such as voice technology using Amazon’s Alexa or the Google Home

systems. Home buyers may also want to control lighting and other utilities from mobile devices and the like.

On the real estate sales front, more technology also amounts to more opportunities for sales professionals. We may see a surge in paperless real estate, or more automation being included in property evaluation, like aerial imagery from drones or viewing a home through virtual reality (VR).

No matter what changes affect the real estate market in 2019, GeoWarehouse can help you adapt. Our tools are accurate, up-to-date, and easy to access, meaning you’ll be able to stay agile and competitive.

Learn more by calling 1-866-237-5937 or visit www.geowarehouse.ca.

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmail

As interest rates increase and mortgage rules shut some would-be buyers out of the housing market, there are less real estate leads available for business.

But there are still the same number of real estate sales professionals — and perhaps even more.

So, with more people going after less business, how can you stay competitive?

One word: agility.

Agility is the key to keeping your real estate business afloat and finding leads even when the numbers appear to be dwindling. Here’s how to put it into practice:

  1. Create relationships.

Relationships have always been important in real estate, but that is especially true in a crowded marketplace. You want to make sure that you have people in your corner to send referrals your way.

This might look like the people you know in your neighbourhood — past clients, friends, family, etc. — but it also applies to other people in the real estate industry.

Think about the people who are your allies. For instance, if you are a real estate agent, who else do you work with regularly — mortgage brokers, private lenders, real estate lawyers, investors, etc.

It could help to expand your industry networks. Chances are that the real estate market is getting tighter for everyone, so creating alliances could be a big help to landing good deals.

It can also help if you are on the same page with the tools you are using. For instance, if you source your property data from GeoWarehouse, your partners can access the same data (either through GeoWarehouse or our tool for mortgage professionals, Purview), which can make working together that much smoother.

  1. Look for motivated sellers and buyers.

When the market is flooded, it can be easy to find motivated clients — they might come right to your door! But as leads are scarcer, you may need to do more legwork to find opportunities.

Think about the demographics of your neighbourhoods. Are there elderly couples who may be looking to downsize? Or younger families who might be looking for more space? If you have a large condo selection you may be able to find renters who are motivated to buy.

Another motivated opportunity — divorce leads. Consider creating relationships with your local courthouses or family attorneys.

  1. Up your digital real estate marketing.

The last two suggestions can be significantly easier using digital marketing.

Social media, SEO targeting, and the like can all help you identify more real estate leads, but it can also help you create partnerships.

For instance, you might search Facebook or LinkedIn for groups with other mortgage professionals in your area.

You may find the local college or university groups and advertise affordable condo opportunities — or break down the true cost of renting vs. buying.

Or you might look for a support group in your area for divorces or consider creating a pay-per-click campaign centred on divorce leads.

A well-rounded approach is critical to remaining competitive.

  1. Search for properties that aren’t on the market yet.

If you are only searching for leads based on properties already on the market, or those seeking you out, it will be harder to stay competitive.

In some cases, you need to take lead generation into your own hands and plant the seed in your clients’ heads.

Demographics can be a great way to do this. You can use a demographic report to search for up-and-coming neighbourhoods, niche markets, areas popular with cultural or generational groups, and the like.

You can then use this information in your real estate marketing.

  1. Consider expanding your listing sources.

If you have traditionally sold one or two dwelling types, it may be time to expand your reach.

Condos, multi-family dwellings, and commercial real estate is rising in popularity even as single-family dwelling sales fall. Assess your portfolio and see whether there is room for you to enter a new market.

  1. Make use of data for up-to-the-minute information.

To truly stay agile, you need to make sure that you are working with data that supports your cause. If you’re using outdated information, inaccurate numbers, or real estate tools that don’t tell the whole story, then you’re already behind the competition.

That’s where a comprehensive property tool is your best ally.

For instance, our tool, GeoWarehouse, allows you to access demographic reports, comparable sales, advanced property searches, and much more. All of this combined can help you find the most qualified leads and stay ahead of your competitors.

The competition may be heating up, but that’s not necessarily a bad thing — it just means that you need to look for ways to stay even more agile.

GeoWarehouse’s tools put in position to focus your marketing and find the most qualified real estate leads. Learn more today. Call 1-866-237-5937 or visit www.geowarehouse.ca.

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmail
January 14, 2019

When it comes to determining property valuation, many of today’s real estate professionals are turning to online tools.

It makes sense. Online property value technology is faster and more convenient than a full appraisal. (Note: online property valuation is a nice complement to an appraisal but shouldn’t replace an appraisal entirely.)

Depending on the information source, online technology can be extremely accurate and provide you with an abundance of information at the click of a finger.

But as online evaluations grow, so too do the tools available for the task. What property evaluation technology is best to use? We turned to the reviews for what users had to say.

  1. MPAC Assessment

The Municipal Property Assessment Corporation determines property assessments for municipal tax purposes. It can be useful for real estate professionals determining a property’s value.

That said, MPAC has its limitations. For instance, the tax value can be very different from the appraised value.

“Many clients look at the Assessed Value (which is often publicly available online on your municipality’s website) and assume that the number provided represents the current market value,” wrote Calvert Home Mortgage Investment Corporation.

“While there are a few instances where the Assessment might equal the current value, it is important to understand that this would only be a coincidence as both values are unique and are done for different purposes at different times.”

The definition of market value can assume a hypothetical and perfect market — not taking into account fluctuations or extenuating circumstances.

The Bottom Line: While MPAC can be a good tool in your property value wheelhouse, it shouldn’t be the only tool that you rely on.

  1. emili

emili is the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) decision system for mortgage insurance. It can automatically consider key factors such as the borrower, the property, the market, and the overall risk.

There is one thing that is important to know. If you are using property valuation tools to comply with mortgage stress testing, unfortunately emili is not enough.

emili does not provide a value for a property being financed. Instead it evaluates an area and, based on the value in that area, agrees or disagrees with the value stated on the application. This means that when emili agrees or disagrees with a value, you are not actually obtaining the value of the specific property being financed.

The Bottom Line: While emili has its uses, it shouldn’t be your only online property valuation tool.

  1. ca/MLS

Realtor.ca – the former Multiple Listing Services — is a well-known listing advertising site. But that is where it’s limited. It does not display historical or sold data.

According to reviewers, Realtor.ca:

  • Has limited search functions.
  • Doesn’t always show the newest listings.
  • Isn’t always up to date – some of the listings may have already sold or sold conditionally.
  • Shares incomplete listing info. Public listings don’t include property taxes, number of days on the market, and more.

The Bottom Line: Realtor.ca continues to be a good tool for advertising listings and real estate marketing, but it shouldn’t be used as a property valuation tool. For one thing, it doesn’t always show the most complete listing data. But for another, it is limited. You can only find properties currently on the market — you can’t search for properties that are not yet listed.

  1. GeoWarehouse

GeoWarehouse is Teranet’s property valuation solution, powered by the Province of Ontario Land Registration Information System (POLARIS).

We have worked hard to create a database that is accessible, comprehensive, accurate, and up-to-date. But don’t just take our word for it. Here’s what others have to say:

Elle Peterson, Sales Representative, Kenora Home and Cottage Realty Inc.

“I have found that the GeoWarehouse reports have helped me to be successful in real estate by using the neighborhood sales report when showing clients recent sales in their area.

“GeoWarehouse reports have been helpful in providing the survey of the land and in identifying neighboring lots, as well as in getting particulars on these lots such as who owns them. This is valuable to a buyer, so he/she will know in advance who their neighbour would be. It also helps a seller to have an idea of property lot lines in the event there is no survey.

“I have had success with clients in using the GeoWarehouse reports, specifically the property details to show the particulars of a property including the legal description and how much the property sold for and when it last sold.”

Asghar Jafri

“GeoWarehouse’s map is up to date and it helped me find the location easily. I could not find the same location in TREB’s maps.

“I was able to get a comparables report easily. The report gave me a quick list which I used to hone in on the best comparables.”

Brian Wilson, Broker of Record – GlobeCorp Realty, Brokerage

“I use GeoWarehouse regularly to help me in preparing valuation reports for my clients, both buyers and sellers. It is an invaluable piece of the pie in helping to determine what properties in the area have sold for and helps to form a better picture for my clients about the value of their property (or prospective property). GeoWarehouse has enabled me to provide a higher level of service to my clients, and as such I’m seen as a better educated service provider (REALTOR). Thanks to the GeoWarehouse team!”

Gail Johnson, Sales Representative – Prudential Town Centre Realty Inc., Brokerage

“Your GeoWarehouse on-line course says it all. GeoWarehouse makes my job easier because the database is:

1- Convenient – access the system, with varying degrees of support, for up to 24 hours a day 7 days a week.

2- Timely – Title Data contained in the GeoWarehouse database is current to within 2 to 3 weeks and Parcel Registers are delivered directly from the POLARIS database.

3- Flexible – you can search records by Owner Name, Address, Instrument or PIN or search aerial maps; and

4- Reliable – data is derived from the POLARIS database.”

See more reviews of our GeoWarehouse system here: https://www2.geowarehouse.ca/testimonials/

If you would like to try GeoWarehouse for yourself, get in contact today. We’ll walk you through the features and explain exactly how it all works to help you determine the most accurate property value available.

Call 1-866-237-5937 or visit www.geowarehouse.ca.

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmail
January 14, 2019

JANUARY 14, 2018

Home prices trended down in the second half of 2018

The Teranet–National Bank National Composite House Price IndexTM for December was down 0.3% from the previous month.[1] It was the third consecutive monthly retreat. The component indexes were down for seven of the 11 metropolitan markets surveyed: Edmonton (−1.4%), Vancouver (−1.2%), Winnipeg (−0.9%), Calgary (−0.6%), Victoria (−0.4%), Hamilton (−0.4%) and Quebec City (−0.4%). Indexes were up for Ottawa-Gatineau (1.0%), Montreal (0.4%), Toronto (0.2%) and Halifax (0.1%).

The recent trend of home prices is clearly downward in most metropolitan markets. For Calgary December was a sixth straight month without an index rise, a cumulative decline of 2.0%; for Vancouver a fifth straight month and a cumulative loss of 2.9%; for Edmonton a fourth straight month and a cumulative loss of 2.7%. For Victoria, Winnipeg and Hamilton it was a third straight month, with cumulative losses of 0.5%, 1.6% and 1.0% respectively. The Halifax index was down 1.6% from five months ago, Quebec City and Toronto were down −0.8% and −0.2% respectively from four months ago. Only the Ottawa-Gatineau and Montreal indexes finished 2018 in strength, rising 7.9% and 4.8% respectively from March to December and both ending the year at all-time highs.

Teranet-National Bank National Composite House Price Index™

 

 

 

The weakness of most of the country’s large urban markets in the second half of the year meant, as table below shows, that the index was down of flat for five markets for calendar 2018Calgary (−2.6%), Edmonton (−0.9%), Winnipeg (−0.5%), Quebec City (−0.1%) and Halifax (flat). For a calendar year, it was the narrowest diffusion of 12-month gains since the recession year of 2008. Up from a year earlier despite second-half retreats were Victoria (6.0%), Hamilton (4.4%), Toronto (3.7%) and Vancouver (1.4%). As expected, Ottawa-Gatineau (5.9%) and Montreal (4.4%) were among the leaders. The 12-month advance of the composite index, at 2.5%, was the smallest since 2009.

Besides the Toronto and Hamilton indexes included in the composite index, indexes exist for seven other urban areas of the Golden Horseshoe. From August to December, indexes were down for Brantford (−4.0%), Oshawa (−2.1%), Barrie (−2.1%), Guelph (−1.1%) and Kitchener (−0.3%). From September to December, the Peterborough index fell 5.1%. Only the St. Catharines index with its 12-month gain of 8.6% ended the year at a record.

Indexes not included in the composite index also exist for seven markets outside the Golden Horseshoe, five of them in Ontario and two in B.C. From August to December, indexes were down for Thunder Bay (−5.3%), Abbotsford-Mission (−1.7%) and Sudbury (−1.2%), and from September to December the index for Kelowna was down 2.0%. Three of these indexes did not display weakness in 2018, finishing the year with strong 12-month gains: Windsor (14.7%), London (10.7%) and Kingston (9.9%).

For the full report including historical data, please visit www.housepriceindex.ca.

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmail

Good news for those who have resolved to buy a house in 2019: the Bank of Canada overnight rate is staying the same for now.

On January 9, 2019, the Bank of Canada (BOC) announced that the overnight interest rate would stay at 1.75% (the rate set in October of 2018) for the time being.

Part of the reason for the hold was Canadian housing investment.

“…consumption spending and housing investment have been weaker than expected as housing markets adjust to municipal and provincial measures, changes to mortgage guidelines, and higher interest rates,” the BOC stated in a release.

“Household spending will be dampened further by slow growth in oil-producing provinces. The Bank will continue to monitor these adjustments.”

Between mortgage guidelines introduced in January 2018, interest rates increasing from 0.5% of 1.75% from July of 2017 to now, and other measures, such as the foreign buyers’ tax, the Canadian housing market has been slowing down.

But it’s not just the real estate market. With higher interest rates and less disposable income to spend, consumers are spending less on non-essential goods. While there are other factors that drive the economy, the drop in consumer spending is having an effect.

The real estate market wasn’t the only reason for the BOC’s decision. Two other factors were the global economic outlook – particularly the U.S.-China trade conflict — and global oil prices. The BOC has said it will continue to monitor these items.

Interest rate increases have been predicted to slow down in 2019, but the BOC doesn’t think they’ll stop altogether.

“Weighing all of these factors, Governing Council continues to judge that the policy interest rate will need to rise over time into a neutral range to achieve the inflation target,” the BOC stated.

“The appropriate pace of rate increases will depend on how the outlook evolves, with a particular focus on developments in oil markets, the Canadian housing market, and global trade policy.”

The next Bank of Canada interest rate announcement is scheduled for March 6, 2019. View the full text of the BOC’s January 9 decision here: https://www.bankofcanada.ca/2019/01/fad-press-release-2019-01-09/.

No matter what changes with interest rates, or the Canadian real estate market, GeoWarehouse has tools that can help. Our property information enables you to stay on top of a changing market.

Contact us today to learn more about becoming a subscriber. Call 1-866-237-5937 or visit www.geowarehouse.ca.

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmail

Browse by Category