Archive for the 'Real Estate Market' Category

Real estate professionals, the Teranet Market Insights Forum on February 12, 2019 is almost full. Don’t miss your chance to attend and receive exclusive insights into the Canadian housing market.

Details:
Tuesday, February 12, 2019
8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
MaRS Discovery District
101 College Street, Toronto, Ontario

Speakers

Stéfane Marion
Chief Economist and Strategist at National Bank

Stéfane Marion is Chief Economist and Strategist for National Bank of Canada and National Bank Financial, a position he has held since November 2008. Mr. Marion is a sought-after speaker on economic trends and their financial implications and is ranked among the leading economists in Canada, according to Brendan Wood International.

National Bank Financial’s Economics and Strategy team is regularly ranked among the top Canadian forecasters and has won recognition for the accuracy of its projections.

In 2012, the C.D. Howe Institute appointed Mr. Marion to its Monetary Policy Council and to the newly established Business Cycle Council. He also sits on the National Bank Pension Committee.

Mr. Marion joined NBF’s Economic Group in 1999. Previously Mr. Marion worked for several years in the federal departments of Finance and Industry in Ottawa, where, in addition to economic analysis and forecasting, he also worked on microeconomic policy impact studies. In particular, he participated in the development of forecasting models and the analysis of the FTA and NAFTA free-trade agreements with the United States and Mexico.

Mr. Marion holds a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree in economics from the Université de Montréal.

Roger Vandomme
Chief Data Scientist at SMC

Roger’s career has been built on the fundamentals of data analysis, predictive modeling and related decision-making. With 20 years in the credit bureau industry, creating credit scores all around the world, Roger has an outstanding unmatched skill-set in the field of predictive modeling. He has completed numerous studies and research on decision heuristics and biases, developing reasoning methods and processes around systemic design and game theory.

Roger created and manages a decision science boutique, SMC, that helps companies and institutions to optimize their strategic decision-making process through the application of mathematical models, machine learning, and artificial intelligence.

Roger teaches business analytics and machine learning at University of Toronto, as well as operational planning at the Canadian Forces College.

Roger holds a master’s degree in applied mathematics from Paris University, an MBA from Queen’s University, and a Master in Defense Studies with the Royal Military College.

Mark Huttram
Director of Business Development and Marketing at Teranet

Mr. Huttram will reveal exclusive market insights and updates from Teranet.

Don’t miss this opportunity. Register for the February 12, 2019 Market Insights Forum here: http://ci23.actonsoftware.com/acton/media/2216/teranets-market-insight-forum

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In the final quarter of 2018, Canadian housing affordability worsened for a 14th consecutive quarter, found economic research from the National Bank Housing Affordability Monitor.

Using data from the Teranet-National Bank House Price Index, National Bank Deputy Chief Economist Matthieu Arseneau and Economist Kyle Dahms released a quarterly report on January 24, 2019 analyzing the final three months of 2018.

And they found that house prices are getting less affordable in many markets.

The Housing Affordability Monitor featured a representative home for each of the 10 metropolitan markets in the House Price Index, including the representative price for the condo market and for the non-condo market, and the average household income needed for each.

Here’s what they found for October, November, December of 2018:

1. Toronto Housing Market

Non-Condo

Price of the representative home in the metropolitan market: $902,916

Household annual income needed to afford the representative home: $165,755

Condo

Price of the representative condo in the metropolitan market: $536,082

Household annual income needed to afford the representative condo: $98,413

2. Montreal Housing Market

Non-Condo

Price of the representative home in the metropolitan market: $369,234

Household annual income needed to afford the representative home: $67,783

Condo

Price of the representative condo in the metropolitan market: $276,889

Household annual income needed to afford the representative condo: $50,831

3. Vancouver Housing Market

Non-Condo

Price of the representative home in the metropolitan market: $1,318,768

Household annual income needed to afford the representative home: $242,096

Condo

Price of the representative condo in the metropolitan market: $638,842

Household annual income needed to afford the representative condo: $117,277

4. Calgary Housing Market

Non-Condo

Price of the representative home in the metropolitan market: $494,689

Household annual income needed to afford the representative home: $90,814

Condo

Price of the representative condo in the metropolitan market: $266,107

Household annual income needed to afford the representative condo: $48,851

5. Edmonton Housing Market

Non-Condo

Price of the representative home in the metropolitan market: $422,508

Household annual income needed to afford the representative home: $77,563

Condo

Price of the representative condo in the metropolitan market: $231,117

Household annual income needed to afford the representative condo: $42,428

6. Ottawa-Gatineau Housing Market

Non-Condo

Price of the representative home in the metropolitan market: $428,595

Household annual income needed to afford the representative home: $78,680

Condo

Price of the representative condo in the metropolitan market: $261,454

Household annual income needed to afford the representative condo: $47,997

7. Quebec City Housing Market

Non-Condo

Price of the representative home in the metropolitan market: $286,491

Household annual income needed to afford the representative home: $52,593

Condo

Price of the representative condo in the metropolitan market: $211,768

Household annual income needed to afford the representative condo: $38,876

8. Winnipeg Housing Market

Non-Condo

Price of the representative home in the metropolitan market: $321,259

Household annual income needed to afford the representative home: 58,976

Condo

Price of the representative condo in the metropolitan market: $223,614

Household annual income needed to afford the representative condo: $41,050

9. Hamilton Housing Market

Non-Condo

Price of the representative home in the metropolitan market: $598,274

Household annual income needed to afford the representative home: $109,829

Condo

Price of the representative condo in the metropolitan market: $445,629

Household annual income needed to afford the representative condo: $81,807

10. Victoria Housing Market

Non-Condo

Price of the representative home in the metropolitan market: $850,469

Household annual income needed to afford the representative home: $156,127

Condo

Price of the representative condo in the metropolitan market: $485,937

Household annual income needed to afford the representative condo: $89,207

In some markets, the quarterly report found that the gap between condo and non-condo affordability is shrinking. The worst deteriorations in affordability in Q4 were in Victoria, Toronto, and Vancouver. The only markets showing an improvement were Calgary and Edmonton. Countrywide, affordability worsened.

View the full 2018 Q4 report from the National Bank here: https://housepriceindex.ca/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/NBFM-Housing-Affordability-Monitor-Q4_2018-Eng.pdf.

No matter what direction Canadian housing affordability heads, GeoWarehouse has tools that make you the property expert. Uncover real estate trends and opportunities before they hit the market.

Become a subscriber today. Call 1-866-237-5937 or visit www.geowarehouse.ca.

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January 28, 2019

Last year in 2018 we saw many changes to the Canadian housing market. Now that 2019 is here, what will this year bring?

We’re breaking down real estate predictions for the year ahead. Here’s what’s on our radar:

1. Interest Rate Increases

In 2018, we saw Canadian interest rates rise from 1% to 1.75% and more hikes are on the horizon for 2019. Economists speculate we may see interest rates reach 2.25% by 2020.

This may seem small, but it could have a big impact on Canadian household debt. It may change what kinds of houses Canadians are able to afford and how well they can keep up with expenses, like utility payments.

2. Housing Prices

Overall, in 2018, house prices in Canada rose at a slow rate — the slowest since 2009 in some months. The Teranet-National Bank House Price Index has captured all of the data from the past year. Toronto and Vancouver have struggled, but other markets, like Montreal and Ottawa-Gatineau, have recorded larger increases over the past few months.

In 2019, we may see more stabilization, but it will likely take more time before we return to where we were.

3. Dwelling Shifts

With increased interest rates and mortgage stress tests, homebuyers are gravitating towards different dwelling types — in particular condos and multi-family units. Supply for single-family residential homes is tight in major cities.

This may mean that multi-family units continue to rise in popularity. It could also mean that more families seek out different areas to reside in — for example, opting for an affordable small town instead of a bigger urban centre.

4. More Affordable Housing

In 2018, the Ontario Real Estate Association (OREA) joined forces with other agencies to lobby the provincial government for more affordable housing options for millennials. Particularly in Toronto, OREA has said there is a housing crisis.

This conversation is taking place across the country about how to create more affordable housing, especially with home prices on the rise. We expect these talks will continue into 2019.

5. Insurance Premiums May Rise

As of January 1, 2019, new MICAT (mortgage insurer capital adequacy test) guidelines are in effect, which could see default insurance premiums rise.

6. Technology

Digital transformation has been a buzzword for a while, but in 2019 we are entering a new age of real estate technology. On the residential front, this will look like more smart devices in homes — such as voice technology using Amazon’s Alexa or the Google Home

systems. Home buyers may also want to control lighting and other utilities from mobile devices and the like.

On the real estate sales front, more technology also amounts to more opportunities for sales professionals. We may see a surge in paperless real estate, or more automation being included in property evaluation, like aerial imagery from drones or viewing a home through virtual reality (VR).

No matter what changes affect the real estate market in 2019, GeoWarehouse can help you adapt. Our tools are accurate, up-to-date, and easy to access, meaning you’ll be able to stay agile and competitive.

Learn more by calling 1-866-237-5937 or visit www.geowarehouse.ca.

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As interest rates increase and mortgage rules shut some would-be buyers out of the housing market, there are less real estate leads available for business.

But there are still the same number of real estate sales professionals — and perhaps even more.

So, with more people going after less business, how can you stay competitive?

One word: agility.

Agility is the key to keeping your real estate business afloat and finding leads even when the numbers appear to be dwindling. Here’s how to put it into practice:

  1. Create relationships.

Relationships have always been important in real estate, but that is especially true in a crowded marketplace. You want to make sure that you have people in your corner to send referrals your way.

This might look like the people you know in your neighbourhood — past clients, friends, family, etc. — but it also applies to other people in the real estate industry.

Think about the people who are your allies. For instance, if you are a real estate agent, who else do you work with regularly — mortgage brokers, private lenders, real estate lawyers, investors, etc.

It could help to expand your industry networks. Chances are that the real estate market is getting tighter for everyone, so creating alliances could be a big help to landing good deals.

It can also help if you are on the same page with the tools you are using. For instance, if you source your property data from GeoWarehouse, your partners can access the same data (either through GeoWarehouse or our tool for mortgage professionals, Purview), which can make working together that much smoother.

  1. Look for motivated sellers and buyers.

When the market is flooded, it can be easy to find motivated clients — they might come right to your door! But as leads are scarcer, you may need to do more legwork to find opportunities.

Think about the demographics of your neighbourhoods. Are there elderly couples who may be looking to downsize? Or younger families who might be looking for more space? If you have a large condo selection you may be able to find renters who are motivated to buy.

Another motivated opportunity — divorce leads. Consider creating relationships with your local courthouses or family attorneys.

  1. Up your digital real estate marketing.

The last two suggestions can be significantly easier using digital marketing.

Social media, SEO targeting, and the like can all help you identify more real estate leads, but it can also help you create partnerships.

For instance, you might search Facebook or LinkedIn for groups with other mortgage professionals in your area.

You may find the local college or university groups and advertise affordable condo opportunities — or break down the true cost of renting vs. buying.

Or you might look for a support group in your area for divorces or consider creating a pay-per-click campaign centred on divorce leads.

A well-rounded approach is critical to remaining competitive.

  1. Search for properties that aren’t on the market yet.

If you are only searching for leads based on properties already on the market, or those seeking you out, it will be harder to stay competitive.

In some cases, you need to take lead generation into your own hands and plant the seed in your clients’ heads.

Demographics can be a great way to do this. You can use a demographic report to search for up-and-coming neighbourhoods, niche markets, areas popular with cultural or generational groups, and the like.

You can then use this information in your real estate marketing.

  1. Consider expanding your listing sources.

If you have traditionally sold one or two dwelling types, it may be time to expand your reach.

Condos, multi-family dwellings, and commercial real estate is rising in popularity even as single-family dwelling sales fall. Assess your portfolio and see whether there is room for you to enter a new market.

  1. Make use of data for up-to-the-minute information.

To truly stay agile, you need to make sure that you are working with data that supports your cause. If you’re using outdated information, inaccurate numbers, or real estate tools that don’t tell the whole story, then you’re already behind the competition.

That’s where a comprehensive property tool is your best ally.

For instance, our tool, GeoWarehouse, allows you to access demographic reports, comparable sales, advanced property searches, and much more. All of this combined can help you find the most qualified leads and stay ahead of your competitors.

The competition may be heating up, but that’s not necessarily a bad thing — it just means that you need to look for ways to stay even more agile.

GeoWarehouse’s tools put in position to focus your marketing and find the most qualified real estate leads. Learn more today. Call 1-866-237-5937 or visit www.geowarehouse.ca.

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November 23, 2018

The Canadian real estate market is in a state of fluctuation, which can make determining a listing price difficult to say the least.

Between rising interest rates, mortgage stress testing regulations, uncertain house prices, increased competition, and the like, there are many factors that might be affecting your usual process for determining property value.

That said, there are several practices that you can use to set a listing price no matter what is happening in the Canadian housing market. Here are our top picks.

  1. Assess the Property Details

This is step number one because it should be on your list regardless of market conditions. You need to understand the property details. For instance, what year was the home built? What data is included in the Land Registry?

In order to start thinking about your listing price, you need to know the answers to these questions and more.

  1. Get an AVM

You may have considered getting an appraisal done — this can be a great idea. But have you thought about an automated valuation model (AVM) report as well?

An AVM report can confirm home value, ownership, and other details quickly and efficiently. It can estimate property value by comparing and analyzing property characteristics against public record data.  It doesn’t replace an appraisal, but it is a good companion to one.

While an AVM can’t review interior and exterior property conditions, some include street view imagery that can help identify issues with exterior conditions, such as property boundary discrepancies. It’s great to leverage automation and historical data analysis to generate the latest information on pricing and ownership and create a big picture report.

  1. Consider the MPAC Assessment

MPAC is the largest assessment jurisdiction in North America. It determines revenue requirements, municipal tax rates, and property tax collection for the Government of Ontario.

An MPAC assessment isn’t always the same as a property appraisal, and often listing prices are different from MPAC’s valuation. That said, it is still valuable information that can be used in your determination.

  1. View the Sales History

Along with the property details, you will also want to consider the sales history. While today’s market may be very different from the last time this house sold (particularly if it is an older home), that data is still important to review.

  1. Look Up Comparable Sales

One of the best ways to determine home value is to see how comparable properties are selling. You can get a real-time view of what similar houses have sold for and use that to set your listing price.

You can also narrow your search by neighbourhood to specifically understand the area where you are selling. Certain regions will be more desirable based on factors like school proximity, parks, shopping areas, and the like. This will stay in style even with a market shift.

  1. Use a House Price Index

The Teranet-National Bank House Price Index is released every month with up-to-date information on house prices across Canada. This digs into 11 different markets and the house price trends those regions are experiencing.

This is important for you to know when making your assessment.

  1. Examine Market Insights

In a shifting real estate market, you want to stay on top of the latest real estate trends. For instance, if you know that condos are some of the most popular dwelling types for millennials, and you are trying to set a listing price for a condo in an area that appeals to millennials, that will help make your decision.

The Teranet Market Insights Report is released regularly and contains data that you can use for your property valuation needs.

While it may be simpler to set listing prices during non-turbulent housing market conditions, it’s still possible to do so in more uncertain times. Be sure to do your due diligence and assess information from multiple sources. Trends can change so fast that you need to stay on top of the data.

Luckily, GeoWarehouse makes it easy to stay informed up-to-the-minute. Our property reports take data from the Province of Ontario Land Registration Information System (POLARIS), so you can trust the reports you receive are accurate and timely. They are also available almost instantly, so you can make a decision with the latest figures.

Learn all about our GeoWarehouse reports today. Call 1-866-237-5937 or visit www.geowarehouse.ca.

Want more information on determining a listing price? Download our free eBook, Digital Property Evaluation in 1-2-3! Get your copy here: http://www2.geowarehouse.ca/property-evaluation-general/.

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Determining a property’s list price can be hard at the best of times, but when the real estate market is constantly shifting, it’s even trickier. In today’s rocky Canadian housing market, how do you establish a house price?

With increasing interest rates, new Canadian mortgage rules, and a record-high level of Canadian household debt, setting a list price might feel a little like shooting in the dark. But having a good understanding of your target market, the area where you’re selling, and using technology to your advantage can make the process a lot easier.

  1. Look at Comparable Sales and Listings

Understanding the Canadian real estate market is your best bet to establishing a list price, even in rocky economic times. Pulling data of every similar home in the neighbourhood that was listed in the past three months can give you a good idea of what other houses are selling for.

If you’re pulling comparables, also keep in mind:

  • The distance — your search shouldn’t be too broad unless you’re selling in a more suburban or rural area.
  • Neighbourhood dividing lines and barriers, such as railways, a major road, a highway, etc.
  • Similar square footage.
  • Similar home age.

When you’re assessing comparable listings, also question the sales history. How many days were they on the market? Compare the original list price to the final sales price and the final sales price to the actual sold price.

The GeoWarehouse Comparable Sales report can give you this information at your fingertips.

  1. Look at the Property’s Sales History

How much has this house sold for in the past? Whatever the results are, file them away with a grain of salt. Remember, the housing market might have been completely different then, but it is still valuable information to know.

The GeoWarehouse Property Details report contains a detailed sales history that will help with your decision.

  1. Consider the Neighbourhood Desirability

Is this an up-and-coming location? Is it close to schools and parks? Is it near a highway or busy road? These can all play a role in how you price the home and can make a less attractive property more appealing and a more attractive property less appealing.

GeoWarehouse Aerial Imagery can give you a birds-eye-view look at the neighbourhood that you can show potential buyers.

  1. Honestly Assess the Property Value

Different tools can give you an appraisal of the property’s worth. For instance, with GeoWarehouse you can access the Property Details report, which includes Land Registry information and MPAC assessment data. When you have a value in mind, compare it with the comparable sales and honestly assess the property you are looking at.

  1. Know Your Target Market

Where do your leads come from? What types of marketing do you have in place and what might work for this property? If you’re not sure, this could be a sign that you need to do more research. Tools like the GeoWarehouse Demographics Report can help you identify important neighbourhood information, such as the age distribution, average household income, and more. Every property is different of course but understanding your potential buyers can go a long way towards establishing list price.

The other factor to consider are the changing market conditions themselves. Analysis such as the Teranet Market Insights report can give you an idea of what types of properties are selling where and an overview of the Canadian housing market as a whole.

The next time you’re trying to establish house prices for listing, access all of GeoWarehouse’s reports, images, and data at www.geowarehouse.ca and find out how you can become a subscriber.

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The Canadian commercial real estate market is continuing to boom, according to a new report from CBRE Ltd.

In 2017, Canada’s commercial market set another record for investments — one of only four countries in the world to do so.

According to the report, there were $43.1 billion in commercial investments last year (this was more than 2016, when there were $34.7 billion). CBRE is predicting 2018’s investments will be even higher.

If you’re in the real estate selling or developing business, this is good news, particularly as new Canadian mortgage rules and increasing interest rates affect residential real estate.
CBRE Ltd. found that Vancouver and Toronto had the lowest downtown office vacancies in North America at the beginning of 2018. Toronto had 3.7 per cent and Vancouver had 5 per cent. The report predicts those rates will fall even lower this year as tenant demand increases.
For those located outside of these major cities, there’s good news, too. CBRE says this trend is spreading across the country. Montreal posted more than 1.9 million sq. ft. Of positive net absorption in 2017, which the report says is a record amount of tenant demand. London, Ont., the Waterloo Region, Ottawa, and Halifax could all be seeing increased demand for downtown office vacancy.
There is also more to gain in rental payments. In 2017, national industrial average net asking rents reached an all-time high of $6.97 per sq. ft.

The report also points to another interesting trend — the demand for land. Land sales will continue to set pricing records in a variety of markets across Canada, it says. The combination of record low office vacancy and industrial availability could also spur new construction.

If you’re not already selling commercial real estate, this could be the time to consider starting. What downtown office vacancies exist in your market? Are there any future construction projects in the works? These could turn up new real estate leads.

There could also be opportunity even if you’re not selling in a major market. If you know that downtown office space is tight in Toronto, but you sell in outlying areas of the GTA, consider advertising any vacant office space that exists outside the city limits.

If you are already selling Canadian commercial real estate, or considering expanding your real estate markets, the CBRE report can be a great resource as it dives deep into real estate trends by city. You can access the report here: https://www.cbre.com/research-and-reports.

Another great resource whether you’re selling commercial or residential real estate? GeoWarehouse. Our reports, images, and searches maximize your understanding of a property’s attributes and value and minimize uncertainty in completing land transactions.

Learn more about our technology at www.geowarehouse.ca.

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In 2017, seven of the top 10 most expensive condo markets in Canada were found in B.C. Vancouver was the most expensive market, with a median condo price of $619,000, followed by five other B.C. cities. Toronto came in seventh on the list with a median condo price of $440,000. Aurora and Burlington are the only other two Ontario municipalities in the top 10.

Teranet Market Insights has your up-to-date Canadian housing information.

See the full report: https://www.teranet.ca/commercial-solutions-blog/march-2018-teranet-market-insights-report-is-here/ or call Teranet today at 1-866-237-5937.

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Normally, springtime is when the Canadian real estate market starts to heat up – just like the weather. As the snow melts, more prospective buyers come out of hibernation and those who have spent the winter considering listing their home are more likely to put it on the market.

In 2018, however, experts are predicting the Canadian real estate market will remain cool in spring due to new mortgage rules and increasing interest rates. While this isn’t a certainty, it does warrant taking a closer look at your spring real estate marketing approach. Even if you’re selling real estate in an area that’s unaffected by the potentially cooling market, springtime can be the perfect time of year to dust off your marketing plan.

Just like you spring clean your house, having a proverbial spring cleaning plan for your real estate marketing can help you evaluate where your efforts are going and how effective they are. You likely have a bucket of tools for spring cleaning your home — sprays, mops, rags, and the like — but do you have a bucket of tools for your spring marketing?

The following may be tools you want to add to your real estate marketing:

  1. Property Details Report

This report from GeoWarehouse contains valuable information such as the Land Registration data, MPAC assessment, property ownership, sales history, property images, and more. It can be used when determining a property’s market value and is completely customizable.

  1. Demographics Report

This GeoWarehouse report is just what it sounds like — it tells you about who lives in a particular neighbourhood. Information includes age distribution, marital status, structural types of housing, owned/rented properties, average household income, and much more.

  1. Client Report

The Client Report from GeoWarehouse gives you the best of ALL worlds. It contains the information that is included in the Property Details Report, Neighbourhood Sales and Demographics Reports, along with new options such as Market Statistics. Like other GeoWarehouse Reports, it is completely customizable and doubles as a great sales tool. Many real estate professionals use the Enhanced Sales Report as a client-facing document and marketing tool.

Using tools in your real estate marketing, such as the ones provided by GeoWarehouse, can help you glean valuable information to assess your properties and neighbourhoods. In turn, you can evaluate your marketing plan to either a) gain peace of mind that your efforts are being directed in the best possible way, or b) find new avenues to focus your marketing even more.

GeoWarehouse’s tools offer data that can make marketing for real estate more effective. To see all of them, visit www.geowarehouse.ca.

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Staying on top of the latest real estate trends is important. In a recent report on international activity in U.S. residential real estate, a new trend seems to be surrounding Canadians snapping up a record number of properties in the United States at record prices. What’s going on?

The 2017 Profile of International Activity in U.S. Residential Real Estate report, released by the American National Association of Realtors, indicated foreign investment in American housing is at an all-new high, mainly because of a substantial increase in sales dollar volume from Canadian buyers.

The U.S. is seeing a large rise in out-of-country buyers according to the report, which also shows exponential growth in both the volume of foreign buyer transactions and the average price paid.

There are two foreign buyer types, resident and non-resident. Resident buyers have immigrated to the U.S., or have a long-term visa. Non-resident buyers use the home on occasion, maybe legitimately so. Yet, more often, they are just property speculators. According to the NAR’s report, most foreign buyers that come from China, India, and Mexico were resident buyers. Buyers from Canada and the United Kingdom were primarily non-residents.

With Canada’s housing prices remaining steady, the main reason for this trend in Canadian real estate seems to be that Canadian buyers want cheaper, more affordable housing to invest in – investments that some Canadian buyers can’t find at home. The NAR report notes that Canadians saw a rapid rise in domestic prices versus the rise in prices in the U.S. which could explain the attraction for Canadian buyers.

Between April 2015 and March 2016, foreign buyers picked up more than $100 billion in residential property – that’s almost 215,000 residential purchases in the United States. Another interesting fact from the report is that houses purchased by foreign buyers were generally priced higher than the median value of all U.S. homes. Chinese buyers purchased nearly 30 billion dollars’ worth of property. Canadians came in second with a record $19 billion worth of U.S. property purchased.

However, of all the foreign buyers, Canadians are the least likely to actually take up residency according to the report. Most are purchasing for a vacation home or property investment, with only a third planning to make the move. Another theory is that, after selling homes in markets such as Toronto and Vancouver, Canadian buyers find themselves with an abundance of capital, and with the more affordable options in the U.S., buyers can do more with that capital. A number of those are retirees moving to some of the top retiree states – Florida, Arizona, and Texas.

To learn more about this real estate trend, you can read NAR’s report here: https://www.nar.realtor/

At GeoWarehouse, we make buying and selling homes in Canada far easier. Find out more about the various features by visiting www.geowarehouse.ca today.

SOURCE: http://globalnews.ca/news/3611104/with-prices-at-home-surging-canadians-have-been-snapping-up-u-s-real-estate-en-masse/

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