Archive for the 'Real Estate Market' Category

November 23, 2018

The Canadian real estate market is in a state of fluctuation, which can make determining a listing price difficult to say the least.

Between rising interest rates, mortgage stress testing regulations, uncertain house prices, increased competition, and the like, there are many factors that might be affecting your usual process for determining property value.

That said, there are several practices that you can use to set a listing price no matter what is happening in the Canadian housing market. Here are our top picks.

  1. Assess the Property Details

This is step number one because it should be on your list regardless of market conditions. You need to understand the property details. For instance, what year was the home built? What data is included in the Land Registry?

In order to start thinking about your listing price, you need to know the answers to these questions and more.

  1. Get an AVM

You may have considered getting an appraisal done — this can be a great idea. But have you thought about an automated valuation model (AVM) report as well?

An AVM report can confirm home value, ownership, and other details quickly and efficiently. It can estimate property value by comparing and analyzing property characteristics against public record data.  It doesn’t replace an appraisal, but it is a good companion to one.

While an AVM can’t review interior and exterior property conditions, some include street view imagery that can help identify issues with exterior conditions, such as property boundary discrepancies. It’s great to leverage automation and historical data analysis to generate the latest information on pricing and ownership and create a big picture report.

  1. Consider the MPAC Assessment

MPAC is the largest assessment jurisdiction in North America. It determines revenue requirements, municipal tax rates, and property tax collection for the Government of Ontario.

An MPAC assessment isn’t always the same as a property appraisal, and often listing prices are different from MPAC’s valuation. That said, it is still valuable information that can be used in your determination.

  1. View the Sales History

Along with the property details, you will also want to consider the sales history. While today’s market may be very different from the last time this house sold (particularly if it is an older home), that data is still important to review.

  1. Look Up Comparable Sales

One of the best ways to determine home value is to see how comparable properties are selling. You can get a real-time view of what similar houses have sold for and use that to set your listing price.

You can also narrow your search by neighbourhood to specifically understand the area where you are selling. Certain regions will be more desirable based on factors like school proximity, parks, shopping areas, and the like. This will stay in style even with a market shift.

  1. Use a House Price Index

The Teranet-National Bank House Price Index is released every month with up-to-date information on house prices across Canada. This digs into 11 different markets and the house price trends those regions are experiencing.

This is important for you to know when making your assessment.

  1. Examine Market Insights

In a shifting real estate market, you want to stay on top of the latest real estate trends. For instance, if you know that condos are some of the most popular dwelling types for millennials, and you are trying to set a listing price for a condo in an area that appeals to millennials, that will help make your decision.

The Teranet Market Insights Report is released regularly and contains data that you can use for your property valuation needs.

While it may be simpler to set listing prices during non-turbulent housing market conditions, it’s still possible to do so in more uncertain times. Be sure to do your due diligence and assess information from multiple sources. Trends can change so fast that you need to stay on top of the data.

Luckily, GeoWarehouse makes it easy to stay informed up-to-the-minute. Our property reports take data from the Province of Ontario Land Registration Information System (POLARIS), so you can trust the reports you receive are accurate and timely. They are also available almost instantly, so you can make a decision with the latest figures.

Learn all about our GeoWarehouse reports today. Call 1-866-237-5937 or visit www.geowarehouse.ca.

Want more information on determining a listing price? Download our free eBook, Digital Property Evaluation in 1-2-3! Get your copy here: http://www2.geowarehouse.ca/property-evaluation-general/.

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Determining a property’s list price can be hard at the best of times, but when the real estate market is constantly shifting, it’s even trickier. In today’s rocky Canadian housing market, how do you establish a house price?

With increasing interest rates, new Canadian mortgage rules, and a record-high level of Canadian household debt, setting a list price might feel a little like shooting in the dark. But having a good understanding of your target market, the area where you’re selling, and using technology to your advantage can make the process a lot easier.

  1. Look at Comparable Sales and Listings

Understanding the Canadian real estate market is your best bet to establishing a list price, even in rocky economic times. Pulling data of every similar home in the neighbourhood that was listed in the past three months can give you a good idea of what other houses are selling for.

If you’re pulling comparables, also keep in mind:

  • The distance — your search shouldn’t be too broad unless you’re selling in a more suburban or rural area.
  • Neighbourhood dividing lines and barriers, such as railways, a major road, a highway, etc.
  • Similar square footage.
  • Similar home age.

When you’re assessing comparable listings, also question the sales history. How many days were they on the market? Compare the original list price to the final sales price and the final sales price to the actual sold price.

The GeoWarehouse Comparable Sales report can give you this information at your fingertips.

  1. Look at the Property’s Sales History

How much has this house sold for in the past? Whatever the results are, file them away with a grain of salt. Remember, the housing market might have been completely different then, but it is still valuable information to know.

The GeoWarehouse Property Details report contains a detailed sales history that will help with your decision.

  1. Consider the Neighbourhood Desirability

Is this an up-and-coming location? Is it close to schools and parks? Is it near a highway or busy road? These can all play a role in how you price the home and can make a less attractive property more appealing and a more attractive property less appealing.

GeoWarehouse Aerial Imagery can give you a birds-eye-view look at the neighbourhood that you can show potential buyers.

  1. Honestly Assess the Property Value

Different tools can give you an appraisal of the property’s worth. For instance, with GeoWarehouse you can access the Property Details report, which includes Land Registry information and MPAC assessment data. When you have a value in mind, compare it with the comparable sales and honestly assess the property you are looking at.

  1. Know Your Target Market

Where do your leads come from? What types of marketing do you have in place and what might work for this property? If you’re not sure, this could be a sign that you need to do more research. Tools like the GeoWarehouse Demographics Report can help you identify important neighbourhood information, such as the age distribution, average household income, and more. Every property is different of course but understanding your potential buyers can go a long way towards establishing list price.

The other factor to consider are the changing market conditions themselves. Analysis such as the Teranet Market Insights report can give you an idea of what types of properties are selling where and an overview of the Canadian housing market as a whole.

The next time you’re trying to establish house prices for listing, access all of GeoWarehouse’s reports, images, and data at www.geowarehouse.ca and find out how you can become a subscriber.

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The Canadian commercial real estate market is continuing to boom, according to a new report from CBRE Ltd.

In 2017, Canada’s commercial market set another record for investments — one of only four countries in the world to do so.

According to the report, there were $43.1 billion in commercial investments last year (this was more than 2016, when there were $34.7 billion). CBRE is predicting 2018’s investments will be even higher.

If you’re in the real estate selling or developing business, this is good news, particularly as new Canadian mortgage rules and increasing interest rates affect residential real estate.
CBRE Ltd. found that Vancouver and Toronto had the lowest downtown office vacancies in North America at the beginning of 2018. Toronto had 3.7 per cent and Vancouver had 5 per cent. The report predicts those rates will fall even lower this year as tenant demand increases.
For those located outside of these major cities, there’s good news, too. CBRE says this trend is spreading across the country. Montreal posted more than 1.9 million sq. ft. Of positive net absorption in 2017, which the report says is a record amount of tenant demand. London, Ont., the Waterloo Region, Ottawa, and Halifax could all be seeing increased demand for downtown office vacancy.
There is also more to gain in rental payments. In 2017, national industrial average net asking rents reached an all-time high of $6.97 per sq. ft.

The report also points to another interesting trend — the demand for land. Land sales will continue to set pricing records in a variety of markets across Canada, it says. The combination of record low office vacancy and industrial availability could also spur new construction.

If you’re not already selling commercial real estate, this could be the time to consider starting. What downtown office vacancies exist in your market? Are there any future construction projects in the works? These could turn up new real estate leads.

There could also be opportunity even if you’re not selling in a major market. If you know that downtown office space is tight in Toronto, but you sell in outlying areas of the GTA, consider advertising any vacant office space that exists outside the city limits.

If you are already selling Canadian commercial real estate, or considering expanding your real estate markets, the CBRE report can be a great resource as it dives deep into real estate trends by city. You can access the report here: https://www.cbre.com/research-and-reports.

Another great resource whether you’re selling commercial or residential real estate? GeoWarehouse. Our reports, images, and searches maximize your understanding of a property’s attributes and value and minimize uncertainty in completing land transactions.

Learn more about our technology at www.geowarehouse.ca.

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In 2017, seven of the top 10 most expensive condo markets in Canada were found in B.C. Vancouver was the most expensive market, with a median condo price of $619,000, followed by five other B.C. cities. Toronto came in seventh on the list with a median condo price of $440,000. Aurora and Burlington are the only other two Ontario municipalities in the top 10.

Teranet Market Insights has your up-to-date Canadian housing information.

See the full report: https://www.teranet.ca/commercial-solutions-blog/march-2018-teranet-market-insights-report-is-here/ or call Teranet today at 1-866-237-5937.

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Normally, springtime is when the Canadian real estate market starts to heat up – just like the weather. As the snow melts, more prospective buyers come out of hibernation and those who have spent the winter considering listing their home are more likely to put it on the market.

In 2018, however, experts are predicting the Canadian real estate market will remain cool in spring due to new mortgage rules and increasing interest rates. While this isn’t a certainty, it does warrant taking a closer look at your spring real estate marketing approach. Even if you’re selling real estate in an area that’s unaffected by the potentially cooling market, springtime can be the perfect time of year to dust off your marketing plan.

Just like you spring clean your house, having a proverbial spring cleaning plan for your real estate marketing can help you evaluate where your efforts are going and how effective they are. You likely have a bucket of tools for spring cleaning your home — sprays, mops, rags, and the like — but do you have a bucket of tools for your spring marketing?

The following may be tools you want to add to your real estate marketing:

  1. Property Details Report

This report from GeoWarehouse contains valuable information such as the Land Registration data, MPAC assessment, property ownership, sales history, property images, and more. It can be used when determining a property’s market value and is completely customizable.

  1. Demographics Report

This GeoWarehouse report is just what it sounds like — it tells you about who lives in a particular neighbourhood. Information includes age distribution, marital status, structural types of housing, owned/rented properties, average household income, and much more.

  1. Client Report

The Client Report from GeoWarehouse gives you the best of ALL worlds. It contains the information that is included in the Property Details Report, Neighbourhood Sales and Demographics Reports, along with new options such as Market Statistics. Like other GeoWarehouse Reports, it is completely customizable and doubles as a great sales tool. Many real estate professionals use the Enhanced Sales Report as a client-facing document and marketing tool.

Using tools in your real estate marketing, such as the ones provided by GeoWarehouse, can help you glean valuable information to assess your properties and neighbourhoods. In turn, you can evaluate your marketing plan to either a) gain peace of mind that your efforts are being directed in the best possible way, or b) find new avenues to focus your marketing even more.

GeoWarehouse’s tools offer data that can make marketing for real estate more effective. To see all of them, visit www.geowarehouse.ca.

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Staying on top of the latest real estate trends is important. In a recent report on international activity in U.S. residential real estate, a new trend seems to be surrounding Canadians snapping up a record number of properties in the United States at record prices. What’s going on?

The 2017 Profile of International Activity in U.S. Residential Real Estate report, released by the American National Association of Realtors, indicated foreign investment in American housing is at an all-new high, mainly because of a substantial increase in sales dollar volume from Canadian buyers.

The U.S. is seeing a large rise in out-of-country buyers according to the report, which also shows exponential growth in both the volume of foreign buyer transactions and the average price paid.

There are two foreign buyer types, resident and non-resident. Resident buyers have immigrated to the U.S., or have a long-term visa. Non-resident buyers use the home on occasion, maybe legitimately so. Yet, more often, they are just property speculators. According to the NAR’s report, most foreign buyers that come from China, India, and Mexico were resident buyers. Buyers from Canada and the United Kingdom were primarily non-residents.

With Canada’s housing prices remaining steady, the main reason for this trend in Canadian real estate seems to be that Canadian buyers want cheaper, more affordable housing to invest in – investments that some Canadian buyers can’t find at home. The NAR report notes that Canadians saw a rapid rise in domestic prices versus the rise in prices in the U.S. which could explain the attraction for Canadian buyers.

Between April 2015 and March 2016, foreign buyers picked up more than $100 billion in residential property – that’s almost 215,000 residential purchases in the United States. Another interesting fact from the report is that houses purchased by foreign buyers were generally priced higher than the median value of all U.S. homes. Chinese buyers purchased nearly 30 billion dollars’ worth of property. Canadians came in second with a record $19 billion worth of U.S. property purchased.

However, of all the foreign buyers, Canadians are the least likely to actually take up residency according to the report. Most are purchasing for a vacation home or property investment, with only a third planning to make the move. Another theory is that, after selling homes in markets such as Toronto and Vancouver, Canadian buyers find themselves with an abundance of capital, and with the more affordable options in the U.S., buyers can do more with that capital. A number of those are retirees moving to some of the top retiree states – Florida, Arizona, and Texas.

To learn more about this real estate trend, you can read NAR’s report here: https://www.nar.realtor/

At GeoWarehouse, we make buying and selling homes in Canada far easier. Find out more about the various features by visiting www.geowarehouse.ca today.

SOURCE: http://globalnews.ca/news/3611104/with-prices-at-home-surging-canadians-have-been-snapping-up-u-s-real-estate-en-masse/

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July 11, 2016

geo2The first quarter of 2016 has closed so we thought, what better time to recap Canadian housing numbers? A good starting point is the Teranet – National Bank House Price Index™ (HPI). The Teranet National Bank House Price Index reports the rate of change of Canadian single-family home prices.

We like to rely on this index for two reasons:

  1. Where the data comes from – data is derived from property records of public land registries – which is the most accurate source for land data.
  2. Coverage – the HPI covers 11 major Canadian Cities – Victoria, Vancouver, Calgary, Edmonton, Winnipeg, Hamilton, Toronto, Ottawa, Montréal, Québec and Halifax.

Here is how Q1 played out:

  • Jan 2016 – Home prices dropped by 0.1%
  • Feb 2016 – Home prices increased by 0.6%
  • Mar 2016 – Home prices Increased by 0.8%
  • Q2 Teaser: April 2016 – Home prices increased by 1.2%

Good news for real estate sales professionals – 3 out of 4 months saw increases. In fact, the past 3 months consecutively have shown increases.

The Vancouver and Toronto markets continue to fuel the market with red hot increases to property values as evidenced by house price indices across the board. The average price of a single family detached home in Canada was widely reported to have soared over 1 million dollars coming into 2016 with Canada’s average recently reported by CBC to be over $500,000 – you can read more on this here: http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/crea-house-prices-march-1.3537143.

Many have speculated that foreign investment is, at the least, behind what seems to be a boom in British Columbia, to the point where the government has even expressed concerns over supply vs. demand. Here are some interesting articles on the topic to whet your appetite:

Meanwhile, in Toronto, soaring house prices are pushing buyers to look outside of the city and we don’t just mean in the GTA. Toronto’s market has led to booms in Hamilton, Barrie and other cities that are not considered the GTA.

No doubt that the Bank of Canada maintaining the incredibly low lending rate of 0.5% is helping as well. With a strong first quarter, all indicators seem to point towards a strong spring and summer in this ever exciting Canadian real estate market. Let’s keep our fingers crossed that things continue to grow as they have been over the last few months!

For more on the Teranet – National Bank House Price Index™ please visit: http://www.housepriceindex.ca/.

Want to take advantage of the tools that give you a bigger piece of the action? Visit www.geowarehouse.ca today.

 

 

 

 

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